Specialized writing and reporting literary journalism example

A DIGI certificate helps them make the best of both arguments. Program Requirements To qualify for a DIGI certificate, students must complete seventeen credit hours in the DIGI rubric, including a capstone experience, usually a research-intensive digital humanities project of their own devising. Digital Media Literacy has been the basic computer and information literacy course at UGA for the past fifteen years, co-taught by faculty and librarians. The course currently has five instructional goals:

Specialized writing and reporting literary journalism example

High School Statutory Authority: Reading, where students read and understand a wide variety of literary and informational texts; Writing, where students compose a variety of written texts with a clear controlling idea, coherent organization, and sufficient detail; Research, where students are expected to know how to locate a range of relevant sources and evaluate, synthesize, and present ideas and information; Listening and Speaking, where students listen and respond to the ideas of others while contributing their own ideas in conversations and in groups; and Oral and Written Conventions, where students learn how to use the oral and written conventions of the English language in speaking and writing.

The standards are cumulative--students will continue to address earlier standards as needed while they attend to standards for their grade. In English I, students will engage in activities that build on their prior knowledge and skills in order to strengthen their reading, writing, and oral language skills.

Students should read and write on a daily basis. For this reason, it is imperative that reading instruction should be comprehensive and that students receive instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, decoding, and word attack skills while simultaneously being taught academic vocabulary and comprehension skills and strategies.

Additionally, developing fluency, spelling, and grammatical conventions of academic language must be done in meaningful contexts and not in isolation. ELL students should use the knowledge of their first language e. Vocabulary needs to be taught in the context of connected discourse so that language is meaningful.

ELLs must learn how rhetorical devices in English differ from those in their native language.

specialized writing and reporting literary journalism example

At the same time English learners are learning in English, the focus is on academic English, concepts, and the language structures specific to the content. While English language learners can analyze, synthesize, and evaluate, their level of English proficiency may impede their ability to demonstrate this knowledge during the initial stages of English language acquisition.

It is also critical to understand that ELLs with no previous or with interrupted schooling will require explicit and strategic support as they acquire English and learn to learn in English simultaneously. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing.

Students are expected to: Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding.

specialized writing and reporting literary journalism example

Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding.

Students are expected to analyze the effects of diction and imagery e. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of drama and provide evidence from text to support their understanding.

Students are expected to explain how dramatic conventions e. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding.

Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding.

Students are expected to analyze how literary essays interweave personal examples and ideas with factual information to explain, present a perspective, or describe a situation or event.

Students are expected to explain the role of irony, sarcasm, and paradox in literary works. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding.

Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about persuasive text and provide evidence from text to support their analysis. Students understand how to glean and use information in procedural texts and documents.

Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students use elements of the writing process planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing to compose text.

Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are responsible for at least two forms of literary writing. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes.

Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write an argumentative essay to the appropriate audience that includes: Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing.

Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to spell correctly, including using various resources to determine and check correct spellings.

Students ask open-ended research questions and develop a plan for answering them. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather.The Pulitzer Prizes, which are awarded each year by Columbia University, are universally regarded as the most prestigious in American journalism.

The New York Times has been awarded Pulitzer Prizes and citations — more than any other news organization. The New York Times, for reporting led by. Coursework ranges from intensive study of literary nonfiction and journalistic fiction, with related writing assignments on a weekly basis, to instruction in the techniques of reporting, writing extended narrative and producing a book proposal.

I found your article, "How to Publish a Great User Manual," to be a bit naive and amusing in its simplification of a profession. As a broadly and variously experienced technical writer familiar with not only the profession, but also the history of and research in the area of technical writing, please understand that.

THE NEWSLETTER OF THE IALJS Literary jourNAlism reporting and writing. To quickly survey the usual sus-pects, there is the The specialized college expanded into a multi-faculty university, which in was named the University of Tampere. At that point there were three.

metaphors used to describe immigrants and immigration policies. With the change back to normal time from daylights savings time today, I thought it might be “time” to look back at a few metaphors about the changing of seasons and the amount of sunlight we enjoy in the summer and miss in the fall and winter.

Literary Journalism across the Globe Bak, John S., Reynolds, Bill Published by University of Massachusetts Press Bak, S. & Reynolds, Bill. Literary Journalism across the Globe: Journalistic Traditions and Transnational Influences.

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