A character analysis of fernand mondego in the count of monte cristo

He becomes the Count of Monte Cristo and dedicates himself to becoming God's avenging angel. The rest of his life is spent, at first, performing acts of goodness and charity for the good people whom he has known. Then he devotes his life to bringing about God's retribution against the evil people who were responsible for his imprisonment. Monsieur Morrel, a shipbuilder and shipowner This is a kindly man interested only in doing good for others and for his family.

A character analysis of fernand mondego in the count of monte cristo

Villefort also changes his name, though for different reasons: Yet, since Mondego pretends that Morcerf is an old family name rather than merely a title he has purchased, the name-change is also a symbol of his fundamental dishonesty.

Alexandre Dumas

All of the other name changes in the novel are external signals of internal changes of character or role. Dumas presents the act of suicide as an honorable and reasonable response to any devastating situation.

As in much Romantic literature, suicide in The Count of Monte Cristo is most closely linked with failed romantic relationships. Monte Cristo is convinced that Maximilian loves Valentine, for instance, only when he sees that Maximilian sincerely wants to die when confronted with her loss.

The frequency with which suicide is mentioned or contemplated by characters might seem to reflect a cavalier attitude toward this most serious of acts. However, suicide is clearly regarded as a serious action: The characters in the novel are not arrogant about life—they simply live it melodramatically, finding the world devoid of hope and meaning on a fairly regular basis.

Politics The Count of Monte Cristo is a historical novel, with key plot elements drawn from real historic events. Politics, therefore, play a significant role in the novel, particularly in branding certain characters good or bad.

Likewise, in his wooing of Valentine, Maximilian fights for social equality, another Bonapartist ideal. Many of the major unsympathetic characters, by contrast, are overwhelmingly associated with the oppressive, aristocratic royalists, such as Morcerf and Villefort.

Others are simply self-serving capitalist opportunists, such as Danglars, responsible for ushering in the soul-deadening age of the Industrial Revolution. In this sense, Dumas does not assign political allegiances arbitrarily, but uses them as windows into the souls of his characters.The Count of Monte Cristo (French: Le Comte de Monte-Cristo) is an adventure novel by French author Alexandre Dumas (père) completed in It is one of the author's most popular works, along with The Three Musketeers.

Detailed analysis of Characters in Alexandre Dumas's The Count of Monte Cristo. Learn all about how the characters in The Count of Monte Cristo such as and Abbé Faría contribute to the story and how they fit into the plot.

The Count of Monte Cristo is a historical novel, with key plot elements drawn from real historic events. Politics, therefore, play a significant role in the novel, particularly in branding certain characters good .

Character List

Fernand joins the military and gains much power. 1 year after Edmond was sent to prison, Fernand asks Mercedes to marry him. She says in 6 months, if Edmond doesn't return, she would.

Fernand and Mercedes get married, move to Paris, have a baby, and are known as the Count and Countess of Mocref.

A character analysis of fernand mondego in the count of monte cristo

Analysis and discussion of characters in Alexandre Dumas père's The Count of Monte Cristo. The Count of Monte Cristo Characters Fernand Mondego (mohn-deh-GOH), the count de Morcerf. Fernand, the Count de Morcerf Oddly enough, Fernand doesn't really get much screen time – or, uh, page-time as it were – in the second half of The Count of Monte Cristo.

By the time the Count has tracked him down, Fernand has already secured himself a .

Character profile for Fernand Mondego from The Count of Monte Cristo (page 1)